BEGIN:VCALENDAR VERSION:2.0 PRODID:-//Middle East Studies Program - ECPv4.8.2//NONSGML v1.0//EN CALSCALE:GREGORIAN METHOD:PUBLISH X-WR-CALNAME:Middle East Studies Program X-ORIGINAL-URL:https://mideast.wisc.edu X-WR-CALDESC:Events for Middle East Studies Program BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191028T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191028T130000 DTSTAMP:20191021T051148 CREATED:20190808T163423Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190808T172106Z UID:2538-1572264000-1572267600@mideast.wisc.edu SUMMARY:MES Lecture: Yael Zerubavel\, “Desert in the Promised Land" DESCRIPTION:Yael Zerubavel\, “Desert in the Promised Land: The Politics and Semiotics of Space in Israeli Culture” \nRutgers University \nThe lecture draws on Zerubavel’s new book\, Desert in the Promised Land\, published by Stanford University Press (2019). At once an ecological phenomenon and a cultural construction\, the desert has varied associations in Zionist and Israeli culture. Yael Zerubavel tells the story of the desert from the early twentieth century to the present\, shedding light on romantic-mythical associations\, settlement and security concerns\, environmental sympathies\, and the commodifying tourist gaze. Drawing on literary narratives\, educational texts\, newspaper articles\, tourist materials\, films\, popular songs\, posters\, photographs\, and cartoons\, Zerubavel reveals the complexities and contradictions that mark Israeli society’s semiotics of space in relation to the Middle East\, and the central role of the “besieged island” trope in Israeli culture and politics. \nAbout the presenter: \nYael Zerubavel is Professor Emerita of Jewish Studies and History at Rutgers University\, where she served as the founding director of the Allen and Joan Bildner Center for the Study of Jewish Life (1996-1918) and the chair of the Department of Jewish Studies. Professor Zerubavel has published extensively in the areas of collective memory and identity\, national myths\, the transformation of traditions\, war and trauma\, and cultural perceptions of space\, drawing on historical sources\, Hebrew literature\, educational materials\, popular and folkloric forms\, as well as in-depth interviews. Her work addresses the impact of nationalism\, secularization\, immigration and dislocation\, the Holocaust and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict on the reshaping of Jewish memory in Israel and developments within Israeli culture. Yael Zerubavel is the author of the award-winning book\, Recovered Roots: Collective Memory and the Making of Israeli National Tradition (University of Chicago Press\, 1995) and Desert in the Promised Land (Stanford University Press\, 2019)\, and is currently working on another book manuscript entitled Biblical Reenactments: The Performance of Antiquity in Israeli Culture. \n URL:https://mideast.wisc.edu/event/mes-lecture-yael-zerubavel-desert-in-the-promised-land/ LOCATION:206 Ingraham Hall\, 1155 Observatory Drive\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States GEO:43.0755115;-89.4052139 X-APPLE-STRUCTURED-LOCATION;VALUE=URI;X-ADDRESS=206 Ingraham Hall 1155 Observatory Drive Madison WI 53706 United States;X-APPLE-RADIUS=500;X-TITLE=1155 Observatory Drive:geo:-89.4052139,43.0755115 CATEGORIES:MES Lecture,MES Lecture Series,Sponsored by MESP ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://mideast.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/192/2019/08/Yael.jpeg ORGANIZER;CN="Middle%20East%20Studies%20Program":MAILTO:cmes@mideast.wisc.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191031T090000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191031T170000 DTSTAMP:20191021T051148 CREATED:20191018T191723Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191018T193318Z UID:2773-1572512400-1572541200@mideast.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Media and Democracy in the Arab World: The Future of Freedoms and Rights in the Digital Era DESCRIPTION: \n \nThursday\, October 31\, 2019\n9:00 AM – 5:00 PM \nJW Marriott Washington DC\n1331 Pennsylvania Ave NW\,\nWashington\, DC 20004 \nAbout the conference: \nIn the 21st century\, media and digital tools are increasingly becoming a central component of the public sphere and the political process\, where the limitations of—as well as the prospects for—democratic reform are evolving with advances in technology. In the Arab world in particular\, digital activism and cyber politics have manifested themselves at least since the mass protests of 2011. \nWhile social media tools and communication technologies have played a central role in uprisings and democracy\, they have also become tools of the repressive policies of authoritarian regimes. With resurgent and entrenched authoritarianism in the last year\, the Arab world has witnessed increased targeting of journalists and activists and further restrictions on freedoms of expression. The emergence of a renewed wave of protest and democratizing potential in the region is juxtaposed with a robust form of totalitarian rule\, one that further threatens the state of freedoms and rights. From hacking and espionage campaigns to the targeting and killing of journalists\, cyber geopolitics—including mass disinformation operations\, troll factories\, smear campaigns\, silencing dissent\, targeted cyberattacks\, and espionage techniques—present a rapidly growing trend in Middle East politics. \nWith high disruptive potential that has low economic and political costs\, cyber weapons introduce new threats not only to freedoms of expression and rights\, but also to the progress toward democracy in the region. The future of democracy and human rights in the Arab world will be significantly impacted by the uses of new media tools and technologies in the political and geopolitical spheres. Indeed\, implementing measures to ensure accountability and ethical policies in cyberspace has become a profoundly paramount objective. \nAt this critical intersection of freedoms of expression and cyber geopolitics\, Arab Center Washington DC is dedicating its fourth annual conference to exploring the role of media and new technologies in human rights and democracy in the Arab world. \nYou can find the conference agenda and list of speakers here. \n URL:https://mideast.wisc.edu/event/media-and-democracy-in-the-arab-world-the-future-of-freedoms-and-rights-in-the-digital-era/ LOCATION:JW Marriott Washington DC 1331 Pennsylvania Ave NW\, Washington\, DC 20004\, 1331 Pennsylvania Ave NW\, Washington\, DC\, 20004\, United States CATEGORIES:Outside UW-Madison END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191111T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191111T130000 DTSTAMP:20191021T051148 CREATED:20190808T164027Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190821T171907Z UID:2543-1573473600-1573477200@mideast.wisc.edu SUMMARY:MES Lecture: Daniel Stolz\, "The Ramadan Debates" DESCRIPTION:Daniel Stolz\, “The Ramadan Debates: Science\, Time\, and Islamic Law in the Early Twentieth Century.” \nUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison \n  \nTalk description: \nIn the early twentieth century\, Muslim jurists and activists across the world debated whether and how to reform the Islamic calendar using astronomical calculation. These debates have often been characterized as a clash between a modernist desire to adapt to modern science\, and a traditional\, “anti-science” position. But this understanding rests on a reading of legal texts that shed little light on actual communal practice.  By foregrounding evidence for how diverse Muslim communities in fact determined when to observe their holidays in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries\, this talk reinterprets the calendar debates as a matter of competing visions for how to promote a globally uniform Islam. \nAbout the presenter: \nDaniel Stolz researches and teaches the history of the late Ottoman Empire and the emergence of the modern Middle East in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  He is especially interested to understand how Ottomans used new kinds of technical knowledge to transform their society in the decades before World War I. His first book\, The Lighthouse and the Observatory: Islam\, Science\, and Empire in Late Ottoman Egypt(Cambridge University Press\, 2018) shows how new astronomical practices enabled the growth of the modern Egyptian state\, as well as the emergence of Islamic movements that emphasized uniform and precise observance of ritual duties.  He is currently beginning research for a new book\, Middle East Public Debt and Global Financial Knowledge. This project investigates the Ottoman state defaults of the 1870s as part of the global rise of sovereign debt and its forms of expertise. \n URL:https://mideast.wisc.edu/event/mes-lecture-daniel-stolz/ LOCATION:206 Ingraham Hall\, 1155 Observatory Drive\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States GEO:43.0755115;-89.4052139 X-APPLE-STRUCTURED-LOCATION;VALUE=URI;X-ADDRESS=206 Ingraham Hall 1155 Observatory Drive Madison WI 53706 United States;X-APPLE-RADIUS=500;X-TITLE=1155 Observatory Drive:geo:-89.4052139,43.0755115 CATEGORIES:MES Lecture,MES Lecture Series,Sponsored by MESP ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://mideast.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/192/2019/08/daniel.jpeg ORGANIZER;CN="Middle%20East%20Studies%20Program":MAILTO:cmes@mideast.wisc.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191119T163000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191119T200000 DTSTAMP:20191021T051148 CREATED:20191017T213407Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191020T024907Z UID:2762-1574181000-1574193600@mideast.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Film Screening: For Sama DESCRIPTION: \nTuesday\, November 19\, 4:30 – 8:00 PM \nMarquee Cinema\, Union South\n1308 W Dayton St\, Madison\, 53715 \n4:30 – 5:00 pm Refreshments\n5:00 – 7:00 pm Screening of the documentary film\n7:00 – 8:00 pm Film commentary and Q&A by UW Professors Nevine El Nossery and Sara McKinnon\, and some of Madison’s newcomers. \nFor Sama is a captivating and honest testament to the experiences of one woman and her community through the recent Syrian War. It tells the incredible story of Waad al-Kateab\, a journalist/filmmaker who filmed her life for over five years during the conflict in Aleppo\, Syria. Waad documented her personal journey as she married a doctor who operated the only functioning hospital in their besieged area\, gave birth to a daughter (Sama)\, and continued filming the cataclysmic events unfolding around her. At its core\, this documentary serves as a love letter from a mother to her daughter\, as Waad captures deeply moving scenes of love\, laughter\, loss\, sacrifice and survival. \nFor Sama has captured the attention of national and international audiences\, winning the Golden Eye Documentary Prize at the Cannes Film Festival\, and multiple audience awards at both the Munich Film Festival and SXSW. This week the film will screen at the United Nations\, where the filmmakers have been invited to participate. \nhttps://www.forsamafilm.com \nCo-Sponsored by: \n\nUW Middle East Studies Program\nUW Human Rights Program\nOpen Doors For Refugees\nMadison Refugee Union\n\n URL:https://mideast.wisc.edu/event/film-screening-for-sama-%d8%a5%d9%84%d9%89-%d8%b3%d9%85%d8%a7/ LOCATION:Union South\, 1308 West Dayton St.\, Madison\, WI\, 53715\, United States GEO:43.0717653;-89.4081342 X-APPLE-STRUCTURED-LOCATION;VALUE=URI;X-ADDRESS=Union South 1308 West Dayton St. Madison WI 53715 United States;X-APPLE-RADIUS=500;X-TITLE=1308 West Dayton St.:geo:-89.4081342,43.0717653 CATEGORIES:Around Campus,Film,MESP Events,Sponsored by MESP ORGANIZER;CN="Middle%20East%20Studies%20Program":MAILTO:cmes@mideast.wisc.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191202T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191202T130000 DTSTAMP:20191021T051148 CREATED:20190808T164640Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190808T164900Z UID:2547-1575288000-1575291600@mideast.wisc.edu SUMMARY:MES Lecture: Miral Al-Tahawy\, "Desert Melodies" DESCRIPTION:Miral Al-Tahawy\, “Desert Melodies: Bedouin Women’s Oral Ghazal Poetry” \nArizona State University \n  \nAbout the presenter:  \nMiral Mahgoub al-Tahawy is an associate professor of Modern Arabic literature\, an award-winning Egyptian novelist and short story writer\, and an affiliated member of the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing at Arizona State University. \nMahgoub al-Tahawy was a Fulbright International Scholar at Columbia University\, and was awarded a two-year postdoctoral research and teaching fellowship at New York University (NYU). She was also an international visiting scholar in the Department of Foreign Languages\, Appalachian State University\, Boone\, NC; the Middlebury College Intensive Language Program\, Middlebury VT; the Monterey Institute of International Studies\, Monterey\, CA; and the Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures (MESALC)\, University of Virginia\, Charlottesville\, VA. She earned her doctorate from Cairo University in Arabic language and literature. \nHer professional contributions include four academic books published in Arabic\, nine refereed articles published in international peer-reviewed journals. She also has published nine refereed book chapters in English. Her focus is Contemporary Arabic literature on two distinct and related themes: Desert narrative in the context of social tribal taboos\, and Modern Arab women’s writing\, exploring Arab Women’s Writing\, Female body and sexuality within the contexts of social restriction\, gender segregation \,Diaspora\, Migration\, Exile and Gender Identity in contemporary Arabic literature. \nAs a literary figure\, Mahgoub al-Tahawy was named “One of the Most Influential Writers of the Oriental World” and “One of most powerful Middle Eastern writers” by Forbes magazine in 2014. Mahgoub al-Tahawy has written four award-winning novels\, each of which has garnered national and international recognition. Most are now taught around the world as part of standard curricula in Arabic literature in translation. Her literary work has now been translated into more than 15 languages. \n  \n URL:https://mideast.wisc.edu/event/mes-lecture-miral-al-tahawy-desert-melodies/ LOCATION:Madison\, WI\, United States CATEGORIES:MES Lecture,MES Lecture Series,Sponsored by MESP ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://mideast.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/192/2019/08/miral.jpeg ORGANIZER;CN="Middle%20East%20Studies%20Program":MAILTO:cmes@mideast.wisc.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;VALUE=DATE:20200220 DTEND;VALUE=DATE:20200328 DTSTAMP:20191021T051148 CREATED:20190808T171941Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190808T171941Z UID:2564-1582156800-1585353599@mideast.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Art Installation:UNPACKED: Refugee Baggage DESCRIPTION:UNPACKED: Refugee Baggage seeks to humanize the word “refugee.” Created in 2017\, this multi-media installation is the work of Syrian-born\, New Haven CT artist and architect Mohamad Hafez and Iraqi-born writer and speaker Ahmed Badr. For UNPACKED: Refugee Baggage Hafez sculpturally re-creates rooms\, homes\, buildings and landscapes that have suffered the ravages of war. Each is embedded with the voices and stories of real people—from Afghanistan\, Congo\, Syria\, Iraq and Sudan—who have escaped those same rooms and buildings to build a new life in America. Their stories are collected and curated by Badr\, who attends Wesleyan University and is himself an Iraqi refugee. These stories are told by kind\, genuine and impressive people that society sometimes labels as marginal and insignificant. By giving these voices a tangible platform\, Badr and Hafez invite the spectator to reexamine the word “refugee” and view it through a multidimensional lens. These are not merely stories of violence and war. These are stories of triumph and resilience\, featuring architects\, lawyers\, journalists\, professors—living and breathing proof of the power of the human spirit. \nThe exhibition tells the stories of different refugees through artist Mohamad Hafez’s miniaturized recreations of a moment in time or memory recollected and accompanied by an audio component with the story told in their own words. Each story is unique\, yet each story tells of a great sense of loss coupled with the courage and force of will it took each refugee to leave their home. \n  \nBio \nMohamad Hafez is an interdisciplinary artist and architect born in Syria\, raised in Saudi Arabia and educated in the Midwestern United States. A self-taught sculptor\, Hafez uses his expertise as a licensed AIA architect as well as his lived experience of Damascus’s rich built environment to create poetic streetscapes high in fidelity and charged in content. His mixed-media sculptural compilations of objects anchor uneasy conversations\, stimulating deeper audience engagement on contentious topics like torture and prisoner abuse\, child starvation in Africa\, or the ongoing global refugee crisis. \n  \nHafez studied at Damascus University and Northern Illinois University before earning his B.Arch. at Iowa State University in 2009. Hafez began practicing sculpture shortly after coming to the U.S. in 2003\, out of homesickness and nostalgia provoked by prohibitive Bush-era NSEERS travel restrictions. Hafez has exhibited at The Brooklyn Museum\, UNICEF House\, NYC; Orlando Museum of Art\, Florida; Yale Art Gallery\, New Haven; and Contemporary Art Platform\, Kuwait\, among others. He has received national attention in the New York Times\, The New Yorker\, Boston Globe\, AJ+\, Global Citizen\, The Guardian\, and NPR. Hafez is currently full-time with the firm Pickard Chilton and was Project Lead Designer on the 2017 50-story\, 1.5 million GSF office tower 609 Main in downtown Houston\, TX. Hafez is the recipient of a 2018 Connecticut Arts Hero Award for his extensive and continuous body of work on issues such as the Syrian civil war\, the worldwide refugee crisis\, and an overall desire to counter hate speech. He serves as a 2018 Yale University Silliman College Fellow. \nThe cost for the exhibit is around $20\,000 and it includes shipping\, installation and de-installation\, 6 weeks of exhibit\, and an artist talk and workshop honorarium. \n  \nLink to Mohamed Hafez portfolio: \nhttps://drive.google.com/file/d/1LieWL6C-AE0873tAg9tTNFESv5MFUthX/view?usp=sharing \n URL:https://mideast.wisc.edu/event/art-installationunpacked-refugee-baggage/ LOCATION:HELEN LOUISE ALLEN TEXTILE COLLECTION\, 1300 Linden Drive\, Madison\, WI\, W53706\, United States CATEGORIES:News,Sponsored by MESP ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://mideast.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/192/2019/08/DSC_7804_2000_c.jpg ORGANIZER;CN="Middle%20East%20Studies%20Program":MAILTO:cmes@mideast.wisc.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;VALUE=DATE:20200306 DTEND;VALUE=DATE:20200308 DTSTAMP:20191021T051148 CREATED:20190808T173325Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190808T173344Z UID:2571-1583452800-1583625599@mideast.wisc.edu SUMMARY:International Conference: Refugees in/from the Middle East DESCRIPTION:Refugees in/from the Middle East: \nPolicy Implications\, Education\, and Artistic Representations \nUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison \nThis interdisciplinary conference brings together scholars from the social sciences and humanities who examine forced migration within the context of the Middle East. It seeks presentations from scholars whose work aligns with one or more of the following themes: \n\nNational\, regional\, and global policy toward refugees: The Middle East is currently both the source of and host to some of the largest forcibly displaced populations in the world. What has been the response to this displacement on the part of national\, regional\, and global actors? What discourse about refugees and immigration have emerged from these various responses? How have these responses impacted and been impacted by refugees in/from the Middle East?\n\n\nRefugees\, education\, and identity: Within the context of current massive displacements\, schools (and education at large) play a very important role in shaping young people’s identity through education policies\, teaching practices\, content of knowledge taught and learned\, and language of instruction. How have teaching practices in the realms of socio-political analysis\, scientific inquiry\, and language impacted and been impacted by refugees in and from the Middle East? How is refugee identity transformed by and transforming the education practices geared toward integration into the host state?\nRefugees and artistic representations: Contemporary artists and writers have used a wide range of mediums to not only to capture experiences of forced displacement\, but also to bring awareness to the healing power of artistic expression in relation to the trauma of forced displacement\, and to highlight the role of art in transcultural communication in host countries. How have contemporary artists and writers responded to the recent refugee crises within and emanating from the Middle East?\n\nWhile its geographical focus is the Middle East\, the conference seeks to contribute to a better understanding of the challenges related to forced migration in the 21st century and to weigh in on attempts to find constructive solutions to these challenges. It aims to open up new ways of thinking about refugees and telling the many important and yet untold stories of migration. \n  \n*Related to the conference and for 6 weeks (mid-february until end of March)\, the School of Human Ecology will host the multi-media installation\, UNPACKED: Refugee Baggage. This exceptional exhibition is the work of Syrian-born\, New Haven CT artist and architect Mohamad Hafez and Iraqi-born writer and speaker Ahmed Badr. Hafez sculpturally re-creates rooms\, homes\, buildings and landscapes that have suffered the ravages of war. Each is embedded with the voices and stories of real people — from Afghanistan\, Congo\, Syria\, Iraq and Sudan — who have escaped those same rooms and buildings to build a new life in America. The exhibition tells the stories of different refugees through artist Mohamad Hafez’s miniaturized recreations of a moment in time or memory recollected and accompanied by an audio component with the story told in their own words. Each story is unique\, yet each story tells of a great sense of loss coupled with the courage and force of will it took each refugee to leave their home.  Visitors will experience short audio clips through headphones and will continue reading the stories online and on exhibit placards. Ahmed and Mohamed will also give a talk at UW-Madison during the conference. They will cover issues of immigration\, creative activism\, community building\, and youth empowerment. For more details\, please check their website at https://www.unpackedrefugee.com/ \n  \nFor more information\, please contact Prof. Nevine El Nossery at elnossery@wisc.edu \n URL:https://mideast.wisc.edu/event/international-conference-refugees-in-from-the-middle-east/ LOCATION:Madison\, WI\, United States CATEGORIES:News,Sponsored by MESP ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://mideast.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/192/2019/08/refugee.jpeg ORGANIZER;CN="Middle%20East%20Studies%20Program":MAILTO:cmes@mideast.wisc.edu END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR